Mon, 24 April 2017
Last Updated: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10am
Solomon Star
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Tisa plans final album

Musician Rocky Hardy Tisa is preparing for a come-back and probably a final album.

With two previous albums under his belt, Tisa now looks at producing a third and final.

“I’ll release my last album soon,” Tisa told the Sunday Star.

He could not say when.

“Oh blue, Bongana” and “Hibiscus Garu” were songs made popular by Tisa, who hails from Anofiu village, east Kwara’ae, Malaita.

Tisa, who founded the once popular band “llus Revival”, said his love for music remains strong despite the passage of time.

“My interest in music started at a young age,” he said.

“When I grew up in 1970s, before going into music recording, I used to sing and play string band.

“That’s our original music during those days and I really enjoyed it.

“My interest in music during those days was based on my belief that music can bring unity, love, comfort and wealth for people.”

Tisa said that in their days, they usually went to perform during marriage ceremonies and other big occasions to entertain people.

“We enjoyed those days.

“But in 1980s, I decided to come into music recording. I first recorded Hibiscus Garu and later Master Liu.

“Hibiscus Garu was one of the songs I composted using a Japanese slang. Garu was a Japanese word for girl.

“I got some Japanese friends we worked together at Solomon Taiyo and they teach me that word.”

Tisa said the song became famous in Solomon Islands in those years and also in Japan.

He said after producing those two albums, he became busy with other things so was unable to come up with a third.

“Seeing that I am growing older now, I want to make a last move before I put everything to rest.

“At the moment I am looking for financial support to do my last recording.

“Music is art that can take you to different places.

“I will do my last recording but I am planning to do it live. Most recordings nowadays I found out are programmed, meaning they just make music programmes and put in the voice.

“I want live recording and wish any studio can do it here.”

He said his final album will feature mostly old music style.

“This is because I want to maintain the beats of the island people.

“Island beat shows our identity that we were islanders.”

Tisa said music these days have changed a lot and some didn’t show our identity.

“But for me, I will still maintain my old music beat.

“Yes music is a wealth.

“But here in the country, people take it as a fun.

“One reason could because the government is not taking it seriously to protect rights of artist to do their songs.

“With today’s technology, it’s worse than before. People just take whatever song and send it via Bluetooth or internet to whomever or wherever they want.

“This has spoiled the market for the poor artist who struggled to earn money out of their talents and skills.

“I want to call on the government to at least look seriously into this one and try to amend laws to protect artist.”

He said no one wants to waste his/her money doing recording earns him nothing.

“We have a lot of talented musicians here but this is the only point that hinders them from going into recording and making money from their talents.

“But I wanted to encourage the young talented musicians to go ahead with their music.”

By LESLEY SANGA

 

 


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