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300 more dolphins slaughtered

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Dolphin capture is a common practice in the Northern region of Malaita. (File photo)
AS this week’s slaughter of over 700 dolphins by Fanalei villagers attracted worldwide condemnation, the villagers refuse to back down.


A reported 300 more dolphins were slaughtered yesterday morning.

Fanalei chief Willson Filei said the villagers are on a “killing spree”.

“I actually spoke out against the hunt which started early this week with over 700 dolphins, but villagers were encouraged by the Fanalei Honiara-based Committee Members, who have been working against the Fanalei-Earth Island Institute (EII) project, since day one of establishing the agreement,” Chief Filei said.

He said he is the anointed chief recognised by the southern region of Malaita to have represent Fanalei.

“But villagers seemed not to take heed of my advice because they were badly influenced by members of the Fanalei Honiara-based committee members.”

He said he is not part of the mass slaughter of dolphins which started this week.

“But to confirm, more than 300 were slaughtered this morning (yesterday). Also on Monday’s slaughter of over 700 dolphins, 240 of them were calves (baby dolphins).

“That was a total waste because these calves do not worth anything. Calves do not have teeth, so it was a waste of the young dolphins’ lives. Even if they were released, they won’t survive because their mothers were already killed.”

He continued to point a finger at the Honiara based committee which he said was influenced by those who should be helping the community.

“We are from one tribe but these people seem not to care about the welfare of those people at home. Some of these people include the likes of Polycarp Kaelafa, Ethel Sigimanu and Atkin Fakaia.”

Chief Filei said he cared more about the deal with EII because he was the person who struck the deal at the first place.

“The Honiara based committee was only formed when they learn that money was actually coming in. They refused and discourage us at the first place.

“But when money came in they tried to push their way in. They then messed up the whole project and encourage villagers to return to hunt.

“I wash my hands from this recent string of slaughter.”

The mass slaughter on Monday this week has attracted widespread condemnation from people, environmentalists and conservationists overseas.

The Solomon Star understands the community is in their hunting period which often takes three months.

The traditional hunting practice is carried out once a year for three month, from January to March.

The current hunting period is expected to continue until March.

By Ednal R. Palmer